9 thoughts on “ Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor - Robert Hale And Dean Wilder* - America (Vinyl, LP)

  1. The Mormon Tabernacle Choir is a large choir of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormons). Since July 15, , the choir has performed a weekly radio broadcast called Music and the Spoken Word which is the longest-running continuous network broadcast in the world.
  2. Aug 14,  · 'Give me your tired, your poor': The story behind the poem on the Statue of Liberty 8/14/ State and feds announce new way to combat 'green slime' still flowing in Madison Heights.
  3. For more information or to purchase this music visit wenticesfibelsunt.ubtsikkornwedserecobawecingwallmar.co
  4. "Give me your tired and your poor — who can stand on their own two feet and who will not become a public charge." -- Ken Cuccinelli's revised Statue of Liberty sonnet.
  5. Feb 11,  · Provided to YouTube by Sony Music Entertainment Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor · Leontyne Price · Irving Berlin God Bless America: A Star-Spangled Spectacular ℗ BMG Music Producer: Thomas.
  6. Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free; The wretched refuse of your teeming shore, Send these, the homeless, Tempest-tossed to me I lift my lamp beside the golden door! Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame, With conquering limbs astride from land to land; Here at our sea-washed sunset gates shall stand.
  7. Dec 12,  · A Celebration Of Praise is a superb collection of twenty two solos performed by Robert Hale and Dean Wilder in over concerts during twenty years of concert ministry. For twenty years, the extraordinary vocal duo of bass baritone Robert Hale and tenor Dean Wilder thrilled America from coast-to-coast and across the world with more than 5/5(3).
  8. Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor Lyrics: Give me your tired, your poor / Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free / The wretched refuse of your teeming shore / Send these the homeless tempest.
  9. “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” These moving words penned by Emma Lazarus are set in stone at the bottom of the Statue of Liberty as a reminder that all are welcome here. Irving Berlin set these words to music in and the piece has become a classic in patriotic repertoire.

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